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Publications

ESSE Publications

European Journal of English Studies. Click here for call for contribution/papers.

HASE Journals

The journal Gramma is published annually by the Faculty of English, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. http://www.enl.auth.gr/gramma.

The e-journal Synthesis is published annually by the Faculty of English Studies, University of Athens. http://synthesis.enl.uoa.gr

HASE Publications

The following conferences, and subsequent publications, have taken place since HASE's inauguration in 1990. For information on the volumes, apply to the individual editors.

  1. 1-4 April, 1993, at Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. Logomachia: Forms of Opposition in English Language/Literature. Proceedings of the conference were published in Thessaloniki in 1994 under the same title, and edited by E. Douka-Kabitoglou. ISBN: 960-243-164-9
  2. 28 March - 1 April, 1996, at the University of Athens. Anatomy in Logos: Anatomies of Silence. Selected proceedings of the conference were published (Athens: Parousia Publications) in 1998 under the title Anatomies of Silence, edited by Ann R. Cacoullos and Maria Sifianou. ISBN: 960-8424-11-9
  3. 7-10 May, 1998, at Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. The Other Within ... Selected proceedings of the conference were published under the same title in 2001 (Thessaloniki: Athanasios A. Altinzis publications), and edited by Ruth Parkin-Gounelas and Effie Yiannopoulou. ISBN: 960-91636-0-2
  4. Fourth International HASE Conference held at the University of Athens on 24-27 May, 2002, entitled "The 'Periphery' Viewing the World: Language, Literature, Media, Philosophy". Selected papers from the conference were published in a volume titled The 'Periphery' Viewing the World. Ed. Christina Dokou, Efterpi Mitsi & Bessie Mitsikopoulou. Parousia Publications in English Studies 60. Athens: Parousia, 2004.
  5. 14-18th May, 2003 HASE, in collaboration with the School of English of Aristotle University and the Hellenic Association of American Studies (HELAAS), organized a large international conference entitled "The Flesh Made Text: Bodies, Theories, Cultures in the Post-Millennial Era". Selected papers were published as Volume 11 of Gramma/ , entitled Wrestling Bodies, ed. Zoe Detsi-Diamanti, Katerina Kitsi-Mitakou & Effie Yiannopoulou, Thessaloniki: University Studio Press, 2003.
  6. Sixth International HASE Conference held at the University of Athens on October 20-23, 2005, entitled (Re)Constructing Pain and Joy in Language, Literature, and Culture. Selected papers from the conference were published as a book entitled Reconstructing Pain and Joy: Linguistic, Literary, and Cultural Perpectives. Ed Chryssoula Lascaratou, Anna Despotopoulou & Elly Ifantidou. Newcastle-upon-Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2008.

New Books by HASE members

Emmanouil Aretoulakis, Forbidden Aesthetics, Ethical Justice, and Terror in Modern Western Culture (USA: Lexington Books, 2016), 182 pp. ISBN 978-1498513128.

Forbidden Aesthetics, Ethical Justice, and Terror in Modern Western Culture explores the potential links between terror and aesthetics in modern Western society, specifically the affinity between terrorism and the possibility of an aesthetic appreciation of terrorist phenomena and events. But can we actually have an aesthetic appreciation of terror or terrorism? And if we can, is it ethical? The author insists, paradoxically, that it is. More here ...

Emmanouil Aretoulakis, Artificial Natures, Unnatural Desires and the Unconscious Other. St. Thomas More's Utopia and Sir Philip Sidney's New Arcadia (Saarbrucken, Germany: Omniscriptum, Scholar's Press, 2015), 271 pp. ISBN 978-3-639-76731-5.

This book explores the notion of artificiality in Renaissance England. What is the artificial in English Renaissance Culture and Literature? In More's Utopia and Sidney's New Arcadia, the artificial element assumes the dimension of a new kind of technological nature which transcends the "artifice-nature" dichotomy. In the two works, artificial natures and fake desires become natural and authentic in a retrospective and unconscious fashion, thus problematizing the very nature of Renaissance reality.  More here ...